We all want peace and may in fact say that we are in part a peace maker. Yet each person, community, or even country bears the effects of past conflicts. Unfortunately, it’s the weakest of the poorest, or most vulnerable which suffer the most.

Pope Francis in his latest message on peace said that some “find it difficult to break free of the chains of exploitation and corruption that fuel hatred and violence.” It seems that if we think we can get away with it, then we will at least attempt to impose ourselves on others.

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This is a direct result of sin and the presence of the evil one in the world. The Pope added that every conflict on every level “is a form of fratricide that destroys the human family’s innate vocation to brotherhood.”

It seems that every conflict begins with our inability to accept the diversity we find in society. This makes us think that we are somehow better than others, and have the right to dominate others, even to the point that we might destroy them.

It seems that every conflict begins with our inability to accept the diversity we find in society.

There is no peace in the world if we come from the attitude that we must dominate others, and place threats of destruction.  Each of us can only attain peace if we realize that our common origin is from God and that we are all brothers and sisters. If you remember our catechetical training, this is what we were taught from the very beginning.

Peace is something that we must work on constantly. We have to keep listening to one another and to see in every potential enemy a brother or sister.

We can never attain peace unless we individually and collectively want it.

One of our serious problems is that which can help us solve this problem, “a Godly view of our world” is evermore removed from our thinking and practice.

What do we think of the biblical teaching? “Lord how often shall my brother sin against me, and I forgave him.” (Mt 18.21-22) Forgiving people are people of peace.

We can never attain peace unless we individually and collectively want it.

Peace in our families, communities and world is far too important a prospect for us to stop trying to attain it.

This article was published in The Church and Life Newspaper, March 2020

This post is also available in: Ukrainian